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Author Topic: thermal cut off fuse, why?  (Read 205 times)

Offline paulmars

  • VIP Member
  • Member Since: Nov 2014
  • Posts: 25
thermal cut off fuse, why?
« on: January 24, 2020, 11:17:07 PM »

Why is it needed? Ive only repaired a few dryers, but this looks like extra part. This dryer has the std High-Limit Thermostat, Operating Thermostat, and Thermal Fuse. However, it also has this Thermal Cut-Off Fuse. This Thermal Cut-Off fuse is located in the heater housing where it feeds the drum and looks more like a thermostat. Its also the most expensive part.

See attached diagram.

#1 Thermal Cut-Off Fuse

#34 High-Limit Thermostat

#42 Operating Thermostat

#59 Thermal Fuse

kenmore 110.96281100

tks,
pa

Offline scrapiron

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Nov 2011
  • Posts: 694
  • Country: us
  • Service Tech Since 1974
Re: thermal cut off fuse, why?
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2020, 12:26:00 AM »
Reason number 1: If the heater coil were to short to the heater box above the high-limit thermostat, it could be the only safety device that would shut the heater off and prevent a possible fire.
Reason number 2: It's required for Underwriters Laboratory's type acceptance.

Offline Thorning

  • Technician
  • Member Since: Jun 2013
  • Posts: 729
Re: thermal cut off fuse, why?
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2020, 12:51:06 AM »
This is a safety device. If it is not in the circuit the dryer could overheat and catch fire.

Offline paulmars

  • VIP Member
  • Member Since: Nov 2014
  • Posts: 25
Re: thermal cut off fuse, why?
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2020, 09:54:21 PM »
Ive watched several troubleshooting videos for this specific model troubleshooting for no heat. Each video tested the High-Limit Thermostat, Operating Thermostat, Thermal Fuse, heating element. One of the videos tested the timer. None tested or even mentioned the Thermal Cut-Off Fuse.

Offline paulmars

  • VIP Member
  • Member Since: Nov 2014
  • Posts: 25
Re: thermal cut off fuse, why?
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2020, 12:14:13 PM »
Before I purchase new cut off, I decided to test the two thermostats:

one is marked L155-25F. it opens at 110F.

the other L250-80F. it opens at 180F.

Some sites say that number after the dash is +/- for opening temperature. Other sites say that is how much less the temp needs to be for closing. I dont know which sites are correct.