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Author Topic: Samsung Front Load - Noisy Operation - Model # WF218ANB - Nearly 10 years old  (Read 369 times)

Offline JumpinJackFlash

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Our Samsung Front Load Washer is getting loud during the Spin cycle.  (Model # WF218ANB / Serial # W04454AS604656E)


Then is started 'squeaking' during the tumble / wash cycle, but only when rotating clockwise.
Now, it's squeaking when rotating in both directions - clockwise and counter-clockwise.   And although I assume the 2 noises are related (squeaking and noisy spinning), I'm not sure if they really are.    It's not throwing any Error Codes, and other than the noisier than normal operation, the washer still works fine.

But it also turns 10 years old later this year.


We are hoping to move within 3 years and will leave whatever appliances are here, with the house.  I have a feeling this unit won't last 3 more months, much less 3 more years, so I'm debating between buying a replacement, or trying to fix this one myself.   I've been pretty successful in the past with other appliance repairs, but I don't know if it's worth trying to repair this particular issue myself.   I don't mind investing up to $200 in parts and the better part of a day if I can fix it myself - especially if I can save about $500 over the cost of an equivalent replacement in the process.  Any thoughts about which direction I should go / how to determine the cause of the noisy operation and whether it's worth the investment (time & $$) to repair?  Thanks in advance for your help - you guys have helped me several times in the past.
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Pete

Offline rkious1

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10 years = Lucky. With the symptoms that you stated I would assume major cost in repairs (In just the parts). I think it`s time to see how much the scrape yard will give you to go toward a new one.

Ross
K-ICE Appliance Repair
Ross Kious
870-351-2847

Offline def

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Pete, I am not familiar with your model however, I did watch a video regarding repair of the spider for your machine. Also, your model is similar to my Maytag in that the bearings are sold by the manufacturer as part of the costly rear tub assembly.

However, the bearings are available aftermarket and can be replaced along with the seal. Doing so will leave you with a like new machine.

It is likely that your shaft seal has failed allowing water to contact the bearings ruining them.

New bearings and seals for my Maytag were about $850.00 from Maytag. There are a number of aftermarket bearing/seal kits available for less than $30.00 shipped free.

Google your model and you'll likely find parts at reasonable prices. Others more knowledgeable than me will hopefully respond with more details.

I would say that your 10 year old machine is certainly worth repairing.

Good luck. Keep us posted regarding your success.




 
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline JumpinJackFlash

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Hmmmm.....one vote to 'scrap' and one vote to 'repair'.....I'm not sure I'm any closer to a decision, but thanks for your thoughts!


I'd feel better if I could be certain that investing (possibly up to) $200 would successfully repair the washer.   My concern is spending the money and time to attempt the fix, find out that I failed, and then end up buying a replacement anyway.....which essentially means the new washer just cost me $200 more because of the parts I purchased.


We may go away for a long weekend (5 or 6 days) sometime in April, so what I might do the day(s) before we leave is; take care of any laundry that we have pending, and then tear into the washer to see if I can determine what parts might need replacing.    If I feel fairly confident that I know what the issue is; I'll order the parts and hopefully they will arrive by the time we are back.   As anyone here knows, it's rewarding when you fix something that you've never attempted to repair before - I hope this ends up being another one of those experiences.


But if anyone else has some personal experiences with this type of repair that they'd like to share, please do!    Thanks!

Offline def

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The bearings and seal for your model are less than $75.00 and with some further searching, probably half that. Why not open up the rear, have a look to see if there is evidence of any water leaking at the rear of the drum. Also, you can rotate the basket and better isolate the squeaking you reference.

If it were me, I wouldn't hesitate to disassemble the machine and have a look. Your model appears to be easy to take apart and reassemble.

Also, view some of the YouTube videos of your model and how to do the seal and bearing replacement.

If I were closer and you were going to scrap the machine, I would buy it and do the repair myself.
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline def

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A quick Google search found the bearings and seal kit for $20.95 on Amazon.
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline JumpinJackFlash

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Thanks def!!

Offline def

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So, what's the verdict? Fix or discard?
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline JumpinJackFlash

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Hi Def,

I am planning to attempt the repair.  I want to make sure the bearings I order are non-Chinese first - I don’t want to have to do this repair a second time![/size][/font]
And I’m going to invest in a small bearing/race seating & removal kit, but I need to find out the size of the bearings so that I order the correct kit.
I hope to do the repair this week or next...will let you know if it was a Success or a Bust!
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 03:07:28 PM by JumpinJackFlash »

Offline def

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Here's my take on bearings made in China.

First of all, the bearings in our front load washers are relatively lightly loaded for their size. Also, speeds are low, well below the maximum RPM allowed for these bearing sizes. These bearings in front load washers rarely fail from defects or poor workmanship but instead from water incursion into the bearing when the seal(s) fail. This eventually produces corrosion as grease is washed out of the bearing and lubrication is compromised. You will notice most photos of old bearings removed from washers are rusty and the bearing seals are missing or damaged.

The bearing class used in our machines are the typical C3 grade bearing with moderate tolerances. The real precision requirements on these bearings are the outer race OD which must be accurate for the bearing to fit and align properly. Also, the hole in the inner race must be accurate and centered to eliminate vibration and allow the shaft to fit correctly. I have yet to find a Chinese bearing with these dimensions inaccurate. Finally, the bearing must be installed with proper preload.

Also, I question using automotive greases to lubricate the bearing, shaft, seals as the new components are installed. Using NLGI II calcium soaped, moly filled grease may cause early seal failure unless the elastomer parts of the seal are Viton. This grease will wash out quickly when contacted by water.

Also, I see some recommend using silicone sealers when installing seals. I use silicone grease to lightly lather the steel shaft which facilitates inserting the shaft into place in the new bearings. Most select automotive grease because it is plentiful and cheap.

Finally, adding too much detergent causes high suds which will eventually find its way past the shaft seal. HE detergents should always be used in front load machines.

I notice the local coin wash provides free laundry detergent. I used it once and noticed very little suds. Now I know why. They want to preserve their bearings.

Unless I was building a space shuttle, low cost bearings from Asian manufacturers are fine with me. I have used them successfully in several repairs.

BTW, you'll find bearings are made to universal standards. If you can ID the bearing size (often easily cross referenced by p/n) you'll find good bearings on Ebay with free shipping. I would search for the OE seal to ensure quality and compatibility.


 
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline JumpinJackFlash

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Thanks for your take on the bearings, def!   


After reading a few reviews from some folks that used Chinese bearings that only lasted a few a year or two after the repair, I wonder if it's worth saving a few dollars on the bearings when the repair will be so involved/time consuming.  I've shot myself in the foot before by skimping and I'm just not sure I want to risk it.

Offline def

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Good news, trusted, name-brand bearings like FAG, Timken, Asahi, NSK will likely cost you about $12.00-$15.00 each, $3-4 more than the less popular brands from Asian manufacturers. And even some of those name-brand companies manufacture in Asian countries.

I say, whatever makes you sleep well at night, go for it.

Keep us posted as to the success of your repair.
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline def

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BTW, a thought...when you are preparing to install your new bearings, first thoroughly chill them in the refrigerator. I also warmed the hub in the tub with a lamp. This provides the optimum conditions to ease the installation. The bearings are a snug fit.
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.