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Author Topic: Kenmore 80 Series Gas Dryer Stopped Heating, Then Resumed Heating. Model Reliab  (Read 1102 times)

Offline giants1

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I need your help.

I have a 2002 Kenmore 80 Series (aka Whirlpool 29") gas dryer model number 11072822101.  I've owned it for 5 years.  Before that it was in storage for 6 years. Before that it used "regularly" before that (I didn't think to ask the prior owner how often that was).  When I got it, the lint wasn't too bad, but definitely not cleaned regularly.  I kept it and the exhaust duct whistle-clean during my tenure and use a surge protector.

A few weeks back, it ran, turning the drum, but did not heat.  I did not know to check the peephole for a flame.  However, I checked all fuses on the back and connections; everything was fine (ie continuity present and no corrosion).  I then tried to run the dryer again, this time looking through the peep hole.  I saw the igniter glow and a blue flame appear.  I then ran 5 loads without problem.

I also checked the drum belt, which looks like new.

Any idea as to what was wrong?

In general, what's the longevity of this model?

Is this dryer a keeper?

What sort of problems commonly occur with this model?

What sort of spare parts should I keep handy?

What are good places to find replacement parts?

Thanks!
« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 10:32:22 PM by giants1 »

Offline Thorning

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One source is Appliance Parts Pros for replacement parts. A quality name brand dryer is usually good for 20 years but some will last 40 years if used lightly.

Offline giants1

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Thanks, Thorning.

Is there a norm for loads per week that counts as regular use?

Also, I'm new to this forum and spent time searching it. I have not found a list of good and bad models/brands and production dates.  Is there such a list here, or would you provide me with your opinion?

Thanks

Offline Thorning

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I work on a lot of dryers and occasionally washers. Washers are usually difficult and costly to repair and I stay away from them and send them to washer heaven ! Dryers are easily repaired and I have done over 400 of them in the last 4 years. Electric dryers are easiest at least for me to repair but gas units are also fairly easily to repair. I use the following criteria to decide if the unit is repairable. If the timer, or motor or heating element is bad the unit is essentially scrap because  the parts cost is too high. I keep a lot of older used parts and use them from time to time. One of the easiest things I do when I take a unit apart is to take the rear drum support rollers off and switch the LH to RH after I clean them and use a little (not much) grease. I sell all of the repaired units for $100 . All of the newer units with electronic control panels are also too costly to repair. Best units to repair are older Maytag, Whirlpool, Kenmore and Speed Queen. I personally have a Speed Queen washer and dryer and IMO are one of the best brands and many I work on are 20 to 40 years old. The repair parts are a little more expensive than others but I find repair parts  for them on E Bay usually at lower cost. If you have a family of 4 or 5  you should expect to do 4 to 6 loads of laundry a week or sometimes more .
A couple of the worst designs IMO are GE and Frigidaire as regards repairs. Also harder to work on as compared to Maytag, etc.
Hope this gives you an insight into laundry equipment. Washers are a more difficult situation. Front load units save a lot of water but are costly to repair.

Offline giants1

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Thanks, again.

What's the advantage of switching the LH and RH rolles?

Offline Thorning

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One roller is above the heater tube and it deteriorates the bearing for the roller. Switching it to the other side which is not exposed to much heat provides longer life when they are switched. I do it all the time. Sometimes they are really bad and cannot be salvaged but most are not.

Offline giants1

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Thanks.

How often do the drum rollers go bad?

Thanks

Offline Thorning

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Under heavy use they might need replacing or servicing in 5 years. Under normal use probably 10 years.

Offline giants1

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Thanks

Offline giants1

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Update.

Today I did one dryer load.  Perfect.

When I tried to run it, the igniter did NOT glow.

Resistance normal at 75kOhms
120 Volts power to igniter

gas valve coils were easy to test, and resistance on all terminals was normal

I turned on the dryer and saw the igniter light.  I did this a second time.

What is the cause of this intermittent igniter problem?

Thanks

Offline Thorning

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The normal sequence when drying is called for is as follows:
The control is pushed to turn on, the drum starts turning,  the igniter coil glows red and shortly a click is heard at the solenoid coils. The igniter causes the  incoming gas to  light while the ignitor turns off. the flame continues until a thermostat shuts if off for a while. All the while the drum is turning. If this sequence does not occur you either dont have gas flow thru the valve or an electrical problem.
One other area to take a look at is the flame sensor. Sometimes the wires get fried at the entry points and it prevents the solenoid coils from turning on.

Offline giants1

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Thanks.

I have a peep hole in the lower left front corner that allows me to check the igniter and flame.

The problem I'm seeing is that the igniter does not light.  When it lights, everything works.

Am I correct to conclude that the problem is either with the igniter itself or the power to the igniter?

In other words, the flame sensor, gas valve, coils, and orifice are NOT at fault for the igniter not lighting, or is there a way that a fault with one of them prevents the igniter from igniting?

Thanks

Offline Thorning

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It sounds like you are not getting power to the igniter.

Offline giants1

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Thanks.

I checked the igniter through the peephole and it works just fine (for now).

Offline Thorning

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If the ignitor is working  and the solenoids click then you must not be getting gas thru the valve. Sometimes the valve will just not work and gas flow does not happen. Gas valves are fairly expensive however . As a last ditch effort I suggest you take the front cover off, and remove the drum  and test the wiring further. You can bypass the door switch to check things out by wiggling wires and inspecting every connection. I have found problems this way when no other way would work

Offline giants1

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Thanks.

Actually, when it doesn't work, the igniter does NOT glow.  That's been the only problem with it: the igniter does not glow.

When that happens, is there any possibility that the flame sensor or gas valve assembly is at fault, or is it only due to lack of power to the igniter or damaged igniter?

Offline scrapiron

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I could be the flame sensor is intermittently sticking closed, with the contacts not releasing, after the burner cycles off. When that happens, the flame sensor is connected across the ignitor and the ignitor will not operate. Thus, no ignition sequence.

Offline giants1

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Thanks.

So next time that happens, I check for continuity on the leads of the flame sensor, right?

Thanks

Offline Thorning

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If there is a problem with the flame sensor it may show up as a poor wire connections (2) at the rivets that attaches the lead to the sensor itself. Take this item off or try wiggling the wires. This is an area that is often overlooked when checking for an intermittment problem.

Offline scrapiron

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Correct. If you read continuity across a cold flame sensor, the sensor is defective. It should only have continuity when it has cycled to the hot position.