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Author Topic: new to refrigeration  (Read 4527 times)

Offline sears tech 87

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new to refrigeration
« on: December 11, 2015, 07:02:40 PM »

I've worked for Sears/A&E for a little over a year. I've been in cook/dish division since I hired. My manager asked if I was interested in refrigeration. They will take care of training and licensing... Does anyone know off what it consists of to become licensed?

Offline afterblast

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2015, 07:30:35 PM »
you have to take the epa 608 certification test and pass at least the core and type 1 section. (you need the type 2 for residential split system air conditioners and the type 3 for larger commercial equipment like chillers and such)
if you study it's a very easy test. you can find a few places that offer practice exams for free online...

however the real issue with refrigeration in my opinion is getting the tools and learning how to properly do it.  the certification test will be pretty much useless in terms of actually working on refrigerators, I'd be careful to find out just what kind of training they offer, and if they will help you purchase the tools or if they have loaner tools that you can use.   at a bare minimum you would need a gauge set, torches, a vacuum pump, a valve core removal tool, a piercing tool, a swaging chisel and the clamp, and a tubing bender..   this is the absolute bare minimum and there are a lot of things like floor mats and heat shields that help make sealed system work a lot easier and less of a pita... 

also you want to find out what their policy is for things like refilling torch tanks... do they pay for it? or do you have to pay for your own?

you want to get plenty of practice in using the torches before you get out on a customers unit.

Offline afterblast

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2015, 07:31:23 PM »
also last I recall the test only costs something like 40$~30$ to take.

Offline AJ

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2015, 08:35:07 PM »
Would you get a pay increase going into refrigeration?

Offline mz3own

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2015, 06:58:46 AM »
you have to take the epa 608 certification test and pass at least the core and type 1 section. (you need the type 2 for residential split system air conditioners and the type 3 for larger commercial equipment like chillers and such)
if you study it's a very easy test. you can find a few places that offer practice exams for free online...

however the real issue with refrigeration in my opinion is getting the tools and learning how to properly do it.  the certification test will be pretty much useless in terms of actually working on refrigerators, I'd be careful to find out just what kind of training they offer, and if they will help you purchase the tools or if they have loaner tools that you can use.   at a bare minimum you would need a gauge set, torches, a vacuum pump, a valve core removal tool, a piercing tool, a swaging chisel and the clamp, and a tubing bender..   this is the absolute bare minimum and there are a lot of things like floor mats and heat shields that help make sealed system work a lot easier and less of a pita... 

also you want to find out what their policy is for things like refilling torch tanks... do they pay for it? or do you have to pay for your own?

you want to get plenty of practice in using the torches before you get out on a customers unit.
to add to the list
nitrogen
silver solder
recovery equipment
leak detector or soap bubbles
If they expect you to buy all the tools you are looking in the neighborhood of 1-2k....
« Last Edit: December 12, 2015, 07:00:29 AM by mz3own »

Offline domain

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2015, 10:23:37 AM »
What do you silver solder Mz3

Offline LowSL2

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2015, 10:38:40 AM »
Sometimes you need silver solder for stainless condenser tubing to copper.
LowSL2
18+ Years of Professional Appliance Repair Experience
Former $ears/a$e tech

Offline sears tech 87

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2015, 11:17:32 AM »
Tooling should not be an issue, they equip the service van with the tools required for refrigeration. They also provide a credit card with a 3k monthly limit for additional tools or parts to get the job done. My biggest thing is the training on how to use all the tools and gauges. I know it's a whole trade on it's own. They are planning on sending me to Chicago our Houston for a week of training. Do you guys think that should be sufficient training to move to hands on?

Offline RAH52

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2015, 11:48:07 AM »
Get the training and give it a shot . Never turn down learning a new skill . From my experience though ,unless its all you do job in job out ,refrigeration can be a pain in the a$$ . Most calls are rush ,you work in cramped quarters being extremly care not to damage things . There is basically 0 room for error ..you have to be on your A game ,if for example you work  on a fully loaded 25cu ft fridge and it messes up again and they lose all their food your in a heap of trouble .That being said if you get real proficient you can make some big bucks .I choose not to do sealed system work anymore ,not worth the hassle .

Offline mz3own

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2015, 03:57:19 PM »
side tip.... Make sure the smoke alarms are disabled and not a hard line to the fire department. :2funny:... very good likely hood your brazing will set one off and you will not have a happy fire dept chief LOL
What do you silver solder Mz3

Boss likes to use 45% silver solder for the work. It's low enough pressures that you don't need to worry about it.
I prefer the 15%sil-flos but my background is from the heatpump side of things where i'm used to 410 pressures.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2015, 03:57:49 PM by mz3own »

Offline domain

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2015, 05:06:04 PM »
Awesome thanks

Offline baldwinappliance

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2016, 10:58:05 PM »
You are supposed to use 45% silver for dis-similar metals...so steel to copper. I use sil-fos 15 for all copper joints and 45% for steel to copper. Mostly the drier and the high side out of the compressor. The 45% I have is flux coated but I always use some flux paste...except for that one time...which is why I always use flux paste.

Offline Pogue

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Re: new to refrigeration
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2017, 03:52:42 AM »
thanks for sharing!