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Author Topic: Heat pump performance in cold weather.  (Read 20063 times)

Offline appltech

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  • Member Since: Feb 2013
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    • Appliance Technology
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2014, 10:35:59 AM »

^^^youre kidding right???


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Offline def

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Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2014, 07:54:35 AM »
I don'need it so, out it goes. Do you want it?
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline niobrara

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  • Member Since: Sep 2009
  • Posts: 1262
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2014, 08:03:54 AM »
Yes and I will pay to have it sent to me.

Offline def

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  • Member Since: Feb 2013
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Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2014, 12:54:59 AM »
I live north of Birmingham, AL. What's it worth?
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline dennispalmer

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  • Member Since: Jul 2018
  • Posts: 7
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2018, 05:52:40 AM »
Below are few steps that can be useful to improve the performance and efficiency of heat pump.
Change air filter :
Fix duct leak.
Service your pump on regular interval.
Use programmable thermostat.

Offline Jonhb87

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  • Member Since: Jul 2018
  • Posts: 11
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2018, 10:47:54 AM »
Below are few steps that can be useful to improve the performance and efficiency of heat pump.
Change air filter :
Fix duct leak.
Service your pump on regular interval.
Use programmable thermostat.

You should also have a professional technician service your heat pump at least every year. The technician can do the following:

-Verify correct refrigerant charge by measurement
-Check for refrigerant leaks
-Inspect electric terminals, and, if necessary, clean and tighten connections, and apply nonconductive coating
-Lubricate motors, and inspect belts for tightness and wear
-Verify correct electric control, making sure that heating is locked out when the thermostat calls for cooling and vice versa
Verify correct thermostat operation.

Offline def

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  • Member Since: Feb 2013
  • Posts: 132
  • Country: us
  • I'll fix anything...sometimes, I'm successful.
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #26 on: July 12, 2018, 01:14:46 PM »
Interestingly enough. I recently experienced a failed condenser fan motor (partial bearing seizure) in the condenser unit. These motors typically use sleeve bearing (no means for lubrication) and are made in Mexico. These motors cannot be repaired successfully due to their pressed and crimped construction. I ordered and installed a new condenser fan motor (about $100.00 on Ebay) and all is now well....except for one thing... when the condenser shuts off, there is a noticeable "bang" noise. I do not know the source of this  bang...I have checked mounting screws and other stuff I disturbed when I removed the fan assembly and can find nothing wrong or adrift. I may replace the load contactor in the condenser just to eliminate it as the culprit. I may also change the motor start capacitor for the same reason.

Any thoughts from any of you experts or non-experts regarding the bang noise?

Also, does anybody wish to purchase my unwanted R22? If so, let me know. The R22 weighs about 36 lbs. which means that the cylinder is likely about 3-4 lbs. shy of a full cylinder.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 01:18:12 PM by def »
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline Jonhb87

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  • Member Since: Jul 2018
  • Posts: 11
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2018, 12:04:07 PM »
Interestingly enough. I recently experienced a failed condenser fan motor (partial bearing seizure) in the condenser unit. These motors typically use sleeve bearing (no means for lubrication) and are made in Mexico. These motors cannot be repaired successfully due to their pressed and crimped construction. I ordered and installed a new condenser fan motor (about $100.00 on Ebay) and all is now well....except for one thing... when the condenser shuts off, there is a noticeable "bang" noise. I do not know the source of this  bang...I have checked mounting screws and other stuff I disturbed when I removed the fan assembly and can find nothing wrong or adrift. I may replace the load contactor in the condenser just to eliminate it as the culprit. I may also change the motor start capacitor for the same reason.

Any thoughts from any of you experts or non-experts regarding the bang noise?

Also, does anybody wish to purchase my unwanted R22? If so, let me know. The R22 weighs about 36 lbs. which means that the cylinder is likely about 3-4 lbs. shy of a full cylinder.

Rattling, Thumping or Banging Noise

If you hear a loud clanking noise coming from your unit, these sounds typically indicate that something has gone awry with your blower assembly or motor. Motor mounts can sometimes come loose, or your blower may be out of alignment. If the sounds become louder when your blower is running, turn your system off immediately. This means something has broken or disconnected entirely. Call a trained tech for inspection and repair.

Offline def

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  • Member Since: Feb 2013
  • Posts: 132
  • Country: us
  • I'll fix anything...sometimes, I'm successful.
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2018, 12:49:01 PM »
The bang occurs at condenser shutdown otherwise, the HVAC system is performing normally in our 90F summer heat. I suspect it comes from the condenser fan motor. When I installed the new motor, I was careful to insure the fan was clearing the cowling. I installed new zip ties to keep the wiring from contacting the fan. I believe the motor design is poor allowing the motor armature to rise and fall as the motor is energized and deenergized...speculation on my part.

As for contacting an expert, installing an electric motor on the condenser grill and attaching the wires to the existing lugs on the motor start capacitor is straightforward...anyone with average skills and tools could do the job.

Now, I am going to disassemble my flat screen TV (I have already replaced the DLP chip) and clean the light engine and cooling fans. That too is a straightforward job most anyone can do.
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.

Offline def

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  • Member Since: Feb 2013
  • Posts: 132
  • Country: us
  • I'll fix anything...sometimes, I'm successful.
Re: Heat pump performance in cold weather.
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2018, 01:08:13 PM »
Below are few steps that can be useful to improve the performance and efficiency of heat pump.
Change air filter :
Fix duct leak.
Service your pump on regular interval.
Use programmable thermostat.

You should also have a professional technician service your heat pump at least every year. The technician can do the following:

-Verify correct refrigerant charge by measurement
-Check for refrigerant leaks
-Inspect electric terminals, and, if necessary, clean and tighten connections, and apply nonconductive coating
-Lubricate motors, and inspect belts for tightness and wear
-Verify correct electric control, making sure that heating is locked out when the thermostat calls for cooling and vice versa
Verify correct thermostat operation.

When I was inside the condenser unit to change the fan motor, I cleaned the bottom of the case to remove the few leaves that had fallen into the condenser. I also removed electrical connections and sprayed with aerosol silicone and checked for secure electrical connection. Next, I looked for any evidence of a refrigerant leaks often seen by refrigeration oil at a leak source. All connections were dry and clean. My filter is an aftermarket filter that gets washed routinely. I also have a prefilter that sits in front of the main filter which goes into the washing machine from time to time. My air handler has no belts or lubrication points. The evaporator fan makes no noise and operates normally. Actually, I think the system is operating normally and I get good condensate flow out of the condensate pipe. I do wish I could get at the evaporator coil to clean it thoroughly...that may take the services of an HVAC person.
I used to repair MK56 GFCS RADAR...now, I'm a farmer.